• Kaveh Jalinous

The Snowman (2017): Film Review





Honestly, The Snowman could be summarized in one word: unnecessary. It would be the easiest way to describe how truly awful Tomas Alfredson's film is. The film tells the story of detective Harry Hole (Michael Fassbender), who teams with a woman named Katrina Bratt (Rebecca Fergueson), to try and catch a killer named 'The Snowman Killer'. The plot sounded simple enough, and a good movie could be made based on the plot, so where did The Snowman mess up? What made this film so brutal and painful to watch? The answer: everything. ​ The only good part of this movie is the 10 second scene of a Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon cruise across bridges in the countryside of Norway. That is the peak of this movie. The film just can't get anything right, and is just a complete mess. There were an overload of plots, which got tangled in each other and didn't know how to work themselves out of the knot. Michael Fassbender is abysmal in his role as Harry Hole, but who could blame him. I wouldn't be able to act with a plot and script like this. The plot twist is completely expected, and it is very easy to figure out who the killer is, saying that there are only two suspects throughout the movie, one of them being completely obvious. The film is way too long, and nothing happens to make the film worth being that long. The Snowman is downright boring, with no moment sticking out or making an impact. That's one of the biggest problems with the film itself. ​ This film is a huge middle finger to the film industry. At a time where it looked like things were getting better, with a spur of good films, such as It, Blade Runner: 2049, and The Meyerowitz Stories, a film like this destroys all the progress the industry has made. For the film industry to get good again, films like this need to be ditched. Or at the very least, edited to make them interesting. If that happens in the future, the industry has a hope. But, as long as films like this coming out, the industry is doomed. The Snowman managed to kill the best parts of murder mysteries, the idea of second-guessing who the killer is, and being entertaining from beginning to end.

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